As Characters Mature…

What age is maturity? 20, 35, 70? Many days I do not act or feel like I am any more mature than a thirteen-year-old. On others, I carry the weight of the world, evident in my wrinkles, drooping shoulders, and overall fatigue. I believe maturity is a constant growth device triggered by life experiences. Some people gain those early and some struggle to accept them and bathe in immaturity a while longer.

This week I thought about Elizabeth Elliott Lestarjette in her role as heroine in all five of the Revolutionary Faith novels. I tried to put myself in her shoes and circumstances. I really do not think I would have fared as well as Elizabeth. But perhaps when faced with the circumstances, my personality flaws would have matured more rapidly to cover my insecurities.

Elizabeth enters the scene as an eighteen-year-old young lady in 1772, Charles Town. Marriageable age. Studious. Garden and cat lover. Musician (teacher). Loving, obedient daughter. Sister and friend. Upper-middle class family. On any normal day, I would guess her to behave as an average teen. What made her maturity level elevate?

The Pre-Revolution decision—

Loyalist or Patriot

The series spans ten years, until Elizabeth is twenty-eight. I look back to my twenties, and I do not shine with any outstanding level of maturity. Why does Elizabeth’s level rank higher than her years?

The American Revolution

in her hometown

I watch the news of war. She lived it.

I might have pinched pennies for groceries. She managed with hoarded food.

I teach school. Her school closed.

I have two children. She did, too, but she had to protect them with her life.

My husband works. Hers impoverished them by supplying the war effort.

I lock my doors. She lived with blackout drapes and curfews with a pistol by her side.

It intrigues me to wonder about the effects of war and famine, of disease and poverty, of death and prison on a young family. Did Elizabeth age physically? Did her face show the signs of distress? Did her mind collapse into a mode of survival with no intellectual outlet? Did her emotions plummet into depression and woes?

My theory after living for many more than 28 years is that the human experience of living takes on a day-to-day existence when faced with calamity. We have a pandemic with all its shortcomings, of which many are emotional. Elizabeth had a war, including a siege and occupation. The big picture with no answers is too much, too daunting, too unbelievable. It’s doable if in little pieces.

I look at the covers of my books to Elizabeth as a young, dreamy, carefree girl to a young, mature woman. Ten years with the experience of a much older woman. I’ve been challenged by Elizabeth—by all women facing the unknown, all pioneers in history. I strive to be a mature being who somehow maintains a portion of the fun-loving, spontaneous, joyful moments.

Please follow Elizabeth on her journey in the Revolutionary Faith series.

Wait for Me (#5) will be released February 9!

Can you think of other characters that have “matured” in the book(s)?

Release Day–Less than two weeks!

I’m so excited about the release of Wait for Me, Book Five in the Revolutionary Faith Series!

February 9, 2021

The rhythm of Wait for Me beats across the miles, into the prisons, through the shackled town from the heart of God to His war-weighted people.

Charles Town, South Carolina, 1780—With the inevitable occupation of Charles Town by the British pounding at the gates, Louis Lestarjette braces for possible imprisonment or worse. How can he provide for his growing family with the evil chains of the enemy binding his source of existence? The scenarios of imprisonment and starvation warp his grasp of control. He realizes he has no control over the outcome of the stronghold of the British, only a sense of survival at almost any cost.

The reality of her impending confinement within the walls of an occupied town ground Elizabeth with an innate drive to protect her children. She bends her definition of Patriot and mother as she invades the enemy’s territory and violates the strict rules, possibly exposing her family to harm. When her brother finally turns his allegiance to the Patriot cause, she allows him to bring the battle into her home as they consider the rescue of endangered soldiers. Her belief in justice amidst chaos wavers as Elizabeth faces the delivery of her baby and of her beloved hometown.  

Discover the destiny of the Lestarjette family in the final book of the Revolutionary Faith Series as they hope and wait upon deliverance from a world under siege.

Preorder ebook here: https://www.amazon.com/Wait-Me-Revolutionary-Faith-Book-ebook/dp/B08HVWDQNL/

Paperback is available for purchase on February 9, 2021

I hope you will purchase and read Wait for Me!

What’s new?

One reason I love to sink my mind into history is my inquisitive desire to know what was new to the people of the era. If you asked me what’s new in my town, as in additional buildings or businesses or infrastructure, I can honestly say a new library. Believe me, that is a big deal, for my town has never had a library, although it will be a small branch of the larger parish one. It is new and boasts the image of growth and change.

As I complete the Revolutionary Faith Series, my mind wanders to a time before railroads, paved interstates, and power lines to the 1770s bustling city of Charles Town, South Carolina. Asking my question then (What’s new?) would produce more than a new library. The city was already almost a century old. In 1670, two hundred settlers founded Charles Town, honoring King Charles II, on the west bank of the Ashley River. Around 1680, the town moved to its present location on the peninsula between the Ashely and Cooper Rivers. Everything was new.

By 1770 my characters, Elizabeth and Louis, would witness the birth of new structures such as houses, churches, government buildings, museums, and schools. During the pre-revolution or colonial era, people struggled with maintaining the old and establishing the new as the birth of a nation battled in their brains. Their city was already ninety years old. But something urged them to slacken their hold to the past and let the new penetrate the very foundation of their lives.

Reading, researching, and writing about history helps me find that balance between the new and the old. Our ancestors had the same struggles with what to grasp tightly and what to hold loosely. This past year has taught us some of the same lessons. Our way of life tilted and altered to adjust to what reigns important and valuable. Perhaps this new birth will produce a better place to weld the old with the new.

February 9 is the release of Wait for Me. Join Elizabeth and Louis in the fight for a new nation while clinging to the foundations of their lives.

https://www.amazon.com/Wait-Me-Revolutionary-Faith-Book-ebook/dp/B08HVWDQNL/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=wait+for+me+marguerite+martin+gray&qid=1611183529&sr=8-1 

Elizabeth, Revolutionary Faith Heroine

Lestarjette home 4Bring Me Near, Revolutionary Faith Book Three will be released on February 26 in print and eBook form. How exciting! I hope all of you will purchase a copy and get involved in Elizabeth’s life. As I researched the American Revolution period, I knew I wanted a strong feminine character. A real one! What would a girl, a woman really be doing on a day-to-day basis on the brink of war and then during a war. Voila, the appearance of Elizabeth.

 

In Hold Me Close, Revolutionary Faith Book One, Elizabeth is eighteen-years-old, a loyal daughter in a Loyalist family. I’m not going to spoil the plot for anyone who has not read the first two books. She has light-brown curly hair and deep blue-gray eyes, about five-foot-five (I wanted her taller than I am!), talented (music) and a lover of gardening. This delightful girl runs head into the colony’s volatile dilemma. I’ll let you be the judge of her character in Surround Me, Revolutionary Faith Book Two as the situation escalates.

I enjoyed researching Elizabeth’s dresses. I’ve included a few for you to see. Her favorite colors are green, yellow, and purple.

 

As the heroine, Elizabeth experiences many difficult dramatic events. She does her best with what she knows and how she feels God is leading. Some of her comments and thoughts in Bring Me Near are: “I choose joy for you, even in the valley.” “Bring Sarah so near to You that she feels Your arms around her.”  “Here she was making shirts for soldiers and singing of God’s mercy and blessings.” “Yet, mundane chores brought simplicity and importance to an otherwise chaotic existence.” “History was not made over casual ladies’ after-dinner gossip. Or was it?”

Enjoy Elizabeth’s journey in Bring Me Near.

Do you have a favorite color for clothing? Would you want to wear a dress from 1770?

Happy Valentine’s Day and a Giveaway

Happy Valentine’s Day!

I hope you will click on the link and enter the giveaway for a copy of Hold Me Close.

Hold me Close front (1)Hold Me Close Giveaway

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next week I will have a giveaway for Surround Me. Be sure to share this information with your friends.

Then, February 26 Book Three will be released: Bring Me Near!  I’m so excited to have all three books available in paperback and eBook form.

You may purchase them from me (autographed), Amazon, or Celebrate Lit Publishing.

Love and blessings,

Marguerite

Bring Me Near release!

Bring Me Near rough (3)I’m so ready for Bring Me Near release day. February 26! A little over 3 weeks. I’m thankful for my new publisher Celebrate Lit. I want to hold this novel, Book Three of Revolutionary Faith, in my hands. The cover is gorgeous. Roseanna White is the cover artist. Each cover is uniquely beautiful and captivating. Even though the novels are about both Louis and Elizabeth, my heroine carries the plot. What a role she and so many women had in the American Revolution.

Bring Me Near rough (2)So what do you think?

Soon I will have the pre-order link for Bring Me Near. Until then, spread the word and have your friends follow this blog in order to see what exciting news is around the corner.

It’s not too late to read the first two books, Hold Me Close and Surround Me. Louis and Elizabeth have some exciting adventures to share with you.

Have you read any of the Revolutionary Faith books?